Lizenzdiskussion

Alles, was nicht direkt mit Python-Problemen zu tun hat. Dies ist auch der perfekte Platz für Jobangebote.
CM
User
Beiträge: 2464
Registriert: Sonntag 29. August 2004, 19:47
Kontaktdaten:

Lizenzdiskussion

Beitragvon CM » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 19:16

Hallo,

immer wieder mal gibt es die Frage, welche Lizenz man nehmen sollte, um eine best. Software der Allgemeinheit zur Verfügung zu stellen. So auch zur Zeit auf der Scipy-User-Mailingliste. Fernando Perez hat John Hunters Standardantwort zur Frage zitiert. Ich kannte zwar den Text, habe aber diese Sache vergessen, bis ich heute wieder mal davon gelesen habe. Ich denke das es auch einige von euch interessieren wird, also stelle ich das mal hier ins Forum - bloß zur Info. Ich jedenfalls finde es durchaus lesenswert ... womit ich allerdings keiner bestimmten Haltung Ausdruck geben möchte.

###### Written by John Hunter in response to this same question

Would you consider licensing your code under a more permissive
license? Most of the essential scientific computing tools in python
(scipy, numpy, matplotlib, ipython, vtk, enthought tool suite, ....)
are licensed under a BSD-ish style license, and cannot reuse GPLd
code.

My standard "licensing pitch" is included below::

I'll start by summarizing what many of you already know about open
source licenses. I believe this discussion is broadly correct, though
it is not a legal document and if you want legally precise statements
you should reference the original licenses cited here. The
Open-Source-Initiative is a clearing house for OS licenses, so you can
read more there.

The two dominant license variants in the wild are GPL-style and
BSD-style. There are countless other licenses that place specific
restrictions on code reuse, but the purpose of this document is to
discuss the differences between the GPL and BSD variants, specifically
in regards to my experience developing matplotlib and in my
discussions with other developers about licensing issues.

The best known and perhaps most widely used license is the GPL, which
in addition to granting you full rights to the source code including
redistribution, carries with it an extra obligation. If you use GPL
code in your own code, or link with it, your product must be released
under a GPL compatible license. I.e., you are required to give the source
code to other people and give them the right to redistribute it as
well. Many of the most famous and widely used open source projects are
released under the GPL, including linux, gcc and emacs.

The second major class are the BSD-style licenses (which includes MIT
and the python PSF license). These basically allow you to do whatever
you want with the code: ignore it, include it in your own open source
project, include it in your proprietary product, sell it,
whatever. python itself is released under a BSD compatible license, in
the sense that, quoting from the PSF license page

There is no GPL-like "copyleft" restriction. Distributing
binary-only versions of Python, modified or not, is allowed. There
is no requirement to release any of your source code. You can also
write extension modules for Python and provide them only in binary
form.

Famous projects released under a BSD-style license in the permissive
sense of the last paragraph are the BSD operating system, python and
TeX.

I believe the choice of license is an important one, and I advocate a
BSD-style license. In my experience, the most important commodity an
open source project needs to succeed is users. Of course, doing
something useful is a prerequisite to getting users, but I also
believe users are something of a prerequisite to doing something
useful. It is very difficult to design in a vacuum, and users drive
good software by suggesting features and finding bugs. If you satisfy
the needs of some users, you will inadvertently end up satisfying the
needs of a large class of users. And users become developers,
especially if they have some skills and find a feature they need
implemented, or if they have a thesis to write. Once you have a lot of
users and a number of developers, a network effect kicks in,
exponentially increasing your users and developers. In open source
parlance, this is sometimes called competing for mind share.

So I believe the number one (or at least number two) commodity an open
source project can possess is mind share, which means you want as many
damned users using your software as you can get. Even though you are
giving it away for free, you have to market your software, promote it,
and support it as if you were getting paid for it. Now, how does this
relate to licensing, you are asking?

Many software companies will not use GPL code in their own software,
even those that are highly committed to open source development, such
as enthought, out of legitimate concern that use of the GPL will
"infect" their code base by its viral nature. In effect, they want to
retain the right to release some proprietary code. And in my
experience, companies make for some of the best developers, because
they have the resources to get a job done, even a boring one, if they
need it in their code. Two of the matplotlib backends (FLTK and WX)
were contributed by private sector companies who are using matplotlib
either internally or in a commercial product -- I doubt these
companies would have been using matplotlib if the code were GPL. In my
experience, the benefits of collaborating with the private sector are
real, whereas the fear that some private company will "steal" your
product and sell it in a proprietary application leaving you with
nothing is not.

There is a lot of GPL code in the world, and it is a constant reality
in the development of matplotlib that when we want to reuse some
algorithm, we have to go on a hunt for a non-GPL version. Most
recently this occurred in a search for a good contouring algorithm. I
worry that the "license wars", the effect of which are starting to be
felt on many projects, have a potential to do real harm to open source
software development. There are two unpalatable options. 1) Go with
GPL and lose the mind-share of the private sector 2) Forgo GPL code
and retain the contribution of the private sector. This is a very
tough decision because their is a lot of very high quality software
that is GPL and we need to use it; they don't call the license viral
for nothing.

The third option, which is what is motivating me to write this, is to
convince people who have released code under the GPL to re-release it
under a BSD compatible license. Package authors retain the copyright
to their software and have discretion to re-release it under a license
of their choosing. Many people choose the GPL when releasing a package
because it is the most famous open source license, and did not
consider issues such as those raised here when choosing a
license. When asked, these developers will often be amenable to
re-releasing their code under a more permissive license. Fernando
Perez did this with ipython, which was released under the LGPL and
then re-released under a BSD license to ease integration with
matplotlib, scipy and enthought code. The LGPL is more permissive than
the GPL, allowing you to link with it non-virally, but many companies
are still loath to use it out of legal concerns, and you cannot reuse
LGPL code in a proprietary product.

So I encourage you to release your code under a BSD compatible
license, and when you encounter an open source developer whose code
you want to use, encourage them to do the same. Feel free to forward
this document on them.

Comments, suggestions for improvements, corrections, etc, should be
sent to jdhunter at ace.bsd.uchicago.edu

Gruß,
Christian
sape
User
Beiträge: 1157
Registriert: Sonntag 3. September 2006, 12:52

Beitragvon sape » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 19:33

Das ganze noch in Deutsch geschrieben und es wäre Perfekt für die jenigen die kein Englisch können.

lg
CM
User
Beiträge: 2464
Registriert: Sonntag 29. August 2004, 19:47
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon CM » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 20:04

Tu Dir keinen Zwang an: Ich korrigiere gerne Deine Übersetzung ;-)

Gruß,
Christian
Python 47
User
Beiträge: 574
Registriert: Samstag 17. September 2005, 21:04

Beitragvon Python 47 » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 20:04

sape hat geschrieben:Das ganze noch in Deutsch geschrieben und es wäre Perfekt für die jenigen die kein Englisch können.


Englisch müsste heute eigentlich fast jeder können, vorallem wenn man sich mit IT und solchen Sachen beschäftigt ist Englisch zu können nahezu eine Pflicht.
mfg

Thomas :-)
Benutzeravatar
Leonidas
Administrator
Beiträge: 16023
Registriert: Freitag 20. Juni 2003, 16:30
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon Leonidas » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 20:40

Python 47 hat geschrieben:Englisch müsste heute eigentlich fast jeder können, vorallem wenn man sich mit IT und solchen Sachen beschäftigt ist Englisch zu können nahezu eine Pflicht.

Ja, da hast du recht. Die Zeit eine neue Programmiersprache zu lernen ist besser angelegt, wenn man stattdessen Englisch lernt, denn ohne das ist man ziemlich aufgeschmissen.

Außerdem kann man mit "Englisch" auch ganz toll anderweilig nutzen. Zum Beispiel kann man Nick Hornby in der Originalfassung lesen 8)
My god, it's full of CARs! | Leonidasvoice vs Modvoice
Benutzeravatar
birkenfeld
Python-Forum Veteran
Beiträge: 1603
Registriert: Montag 20. März 2006, 15:29
Wohnort: Die aufstrebende Universitätsstadt bei München

Beitragvon birkenfeld » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 21:22

Und Neal Stephenson! Lohnt sich wirklich, und erweitert den (passiven) Wortschatz ungemein...
Dann lieber noch Vim 7 als Windows 7.

http://pythonic.pocoo.org/
CM
User
Beiträge: 2464
Registriert: Sonntag 29. August 2004, 19:47
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon CM » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 22:23

Also erstens würde ich mich schon freuen hier im Forum häufiger gutes Deutsch zu lesen ... aber bei dem Thema waren wir in den letzten Tagen schon einmal. Und zweitens habt ihr einen seltsamen Literaturgeschmack. Na ja, darüber läßt sich nun wirklich nicht streiten. Und dritten find ich es ganz besonders seltsam wie off-topic man doch im off-topic-Bereich werden kann ... *kopfkratz*

:lol:

edit: Tippfehler korrigiert ;-)
Zuletzt geändert von CM am Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 23:24, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.
sape
User
Beiträge: 1157
Registriert: Sonntag 3. September 2006, 12:52

Beitragvon sape » Freitag 19. Januar 2007, 23:04

CM hat geschrieben:Tu Dir keinen Zwang an: Ich korrigiere gerne Deine Übersetzung ;-)
Kann kein Englisch.

CM hat geschrieben:Also ersten würde ich mich schon freuen hier im Forum häufiger gutes Deutsch zu lesen ...

Also, erstens würde...

SCNR :lol:

Aber wie du schon sagtest: Das Thema hatten wir schon letztens.
merlin_emrys
User
Beiträge: 110
Registriert: Freitag 3. März 2006, 09:47

Beitragvon merlin_emrys » Samstag 20. Januar 2007, 05:46

CM hat geschrieben:Tu Dir keinen Zwang an: Ich korrigiere gerne Deine Übersetzung ;-)


Würde das auch für eine Übersetzung von mir gelten?
sape
User
Beiträge: 1157
Registriert: Sonntag 3. September 2006, 12:52

Beitragvon sape » Samstag 20. Januar 2007, 22:24

CM hat geschrieben:edit: Tippfehler korrigiert ;-)
;)

CM hat geschrieben:Deutsch zu lesen ... aber bei dem
Deppenleerzeichen neuerdings wider in Mode?
Benutzeravatar
Luzandro
User
Beiträge: 87
Registriert: Freitag 21. April 2006, 17:03

Beitragvon Luzandro » Sonntag 21. Januar 2007, 09:27

Sorry für OT, aber:
sape hat geschrieben:
CM hat geschrieben:edit: Tippfehler korrigiert ;-)
;)

CM hat geschrieben:Deutsch zu lesen ... aber bei dem
Deppenleerzeichen neuerdings wider in Mode?

Wo genau ist hier für dich bitte ein Deppenleerzeichen? Es ist ja schön, wenn sich wieder ein paar Leute mehr Gedanken über die verwendete Sprache machen, aber das ist ja nun wirklich lächerlich, noch dazu wo ich an CMs Post nichts auszusetzen sehe und deine "Kritik" dafür wieder einen Tippfehler enthält. Also wenn es nicht wirklich so ausufert wie vor der letzten Diskussion wäre es sehr angenehm, wenn man diese kritische Haltung in erster Linie einmal seinen eigenen Beiträgen entgegen bringt.
sape
User
Beiträge: 1157
Registriert: Sonntag 3. September 2006, 12:52

Beitragvon sape » Sonntag 21. Januar 2007, 10:16

Luzandro, zwischen "Deutsch zu lesen" und "..." ist ein unnötiges Leerzeichen. Zwischen "..." und "aber bei dem" das gleiche.


Luzandro hat geschrieben: Also wenn es nicht wirklich so ausufert wie vor der letzten Diskussion wäre es sehr angenehm, wenn man diese kritische Haltung in erster Linie einmal seinen eigenen Beiträgen entgegen bringt

Eben, das war meine Intention. Man sollte vor seiner eigenen Haustür kehren. Ohne, jemanden anzugreifen (Ist nicht persönlich gemeint CM. Damit spreche ich allgemein alle an auf die folgendes zutrift.), aber sich über die Rechtschreibung von einigen zu ärgern und solche schlechten Aussagen zu machen wie "Also erstens würde ich mich schon freuen hier im Forum häufiger gutes Deutsch zu lesen" und dann selber 1K Fehler reinhauen, zieht das ganze ins lächerliche.

Aber ich weiß, keiner versteht mal wider was ich eigentlich sagen will und bezwecken wollte...
Benutzeravatar
gerold
Python-Forum Veteran
Beiträge: 5554
Registriert: Samstag 28. Februar 2004, 22:04
Wohnort: Telfs (Tirol)
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon gerold » Sonntag 21. Januar 2007, 11:29

Deppenleerzeichen


Hört bitte mit diesem Unsinn auf. Konzentriert euch bitte wieder auf das Kernthema dieses Boards --> "Python".

Vielleicht kommt sogar auch noch die Idee auf, dass niemand mit Python programmieren darf, der nicht Englisch kann. :|
Dann könnt ihr mich auch vergessen, denn ich kämpfe seit vielen Jahren mit meiner "Englisch"-Lernschwäche.

Vielen Dank,
Gerold
http://halvar.at | Kleiner Bascom AVR Kurs
Wissen hat eine wunderbare Eigenschaft: Es verdoppelt sich, wenn man es teilt.
sape
User
Beiträge: 1157
Registriert: Sonntag 3. September 2006, 12:52

Beitragvon sape » Sonntag 21. Januar 2007, 11:37

@Gerold:
Sorry :/ So war das gar nicht gemeint. :( War genau umgekehrt gemeint und daher ist mein Post ironisch zu verstehen.

@all
Wollte nur mal dampf ablassen wegen diesen immer wiederkehrenden dummen Thema Deutsche Rechtschreibung. Irgendwann geht das echt auf den Sack. Versteht mich nicht Falsch: Ich finde es persönlich auch scheiße, wenn mir ein Buchstabensalat entgegen fliegen, aber man kann es auch übertreiben mit der Kritik (Die in letzter Zeit zu oft kommt).

Deshalb, falls meine ironischen Posts falsch aufgefasst wurde, will ich mich dafür entschuldigen.

Ab sofort halte ich mich aus diesem Thema raus.

lg
Benutzeravatar
mitsuhiko
User
Beiträge: 1790
Registriert: Donnerstag 28. Oktober 2004, 16:33
Wohnort: Graz, Steiermark - Österreich
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon mitsuhiko » Sonntag 21. Januar 2007, 11:55

sape hat geschrieben:
CM hat geschrieben:Deutsch zu lesen ... aber bei dem
Deppenleerzeichen neuerdings wider in Mode?


Betreffend des Auslassungszeichen sind sich wohl Typographen auch nicht ganz einig. Aber das ist zumindest mal kein Fehler.
Wikipedia hat geschrieben:Bringhurst suggests that normally an ellipsis should be spaced fore-and-aft to separate it from the text, but when it combines with other punctuation, the leading space disappears and the other punctuation follows. He provides the following examples:
i ... j k.... l..., l l, ... l m...? n...!

Und die deutsche Wikipedia schlägt die Leerräume zwischen den Auslassungszeichen sogar vor: Auslassungspunkte #Verwendung

</OT>
TUFKAB – the user formerly known as blackbird

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder